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Chapter 10
 

HOW DO YOU REPORT WHAT SOURCES SAY?

 

Examples

Exercises

 

QUOTING SOCIAL MEDIA

 

Here's the Associated Press's take on quoting social media.  And this piece reminds us to be vigilant when including social media content in our stories.

 

Reuters, originally a British news agency, calls it "picking up," and the Reuters website's discussion of quoting social media is helpful.

 

 

AVOIDING LIBEL

 

The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press has definitions, explanations and guidelines for avoiding libel.

 

The Electronic Frontier Foundation, which focuses on online news, also has a good libel overview site.

 

The Digital Media Law Project has a good discussion of actual malice, as well as guidelines and discussion about libel (DMLP is hosted by Harvard University's Berkman Center for Internet & Society).

 

What's Twibel?  Just a catchy name for libel on Twitter.  The important thing to know is that defamation is an issue on social media as well.  Attorney Cara Adams' post is a good introduction. And these tips, intended for a broader audience, are good for journalists to keep in mind.

 

 

WHAT LEGAL PRIVILEGES DO REPORTERS HAVE?

 

The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press provides a helpful state-by-state guide to reporter's privilege.

 

 

NEW YORK TIMES COMPANY v. SULLIVAN 

 

"There may be no modern Supreme Court decision that has had more of an impact on American free speech values than the landmark New York Times Co. v. Sullivan case," says this Forbes opinion piece about the continuing impact of the case.

 

Here's an overview of the case from the Oyez Project at Chicago-Kent College of Law.

Featured

The Kitchen Sisters

 

Producers Davida Nelson and Nikki Silva say they gradually learned to edit their own voices out of their stories they did for their radio show, "The Kitchen Sisters":  "We don't voice our pieces."  In one of their early stories, they found that their voiceovers took away from the atmosphere of the story, so they removed most of the voiceovers—and they never looked back.

New York Times Company v. Sullivan

This is the advertisement that led to this famous Supreme Court case. The ad, paid for by a civil rights group, describes the violent treatment of demonstrators by southern law enforcement.